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Heart, front view
Heart, front view


MUGA test
MUGA test


Definition:

Nuclear ventriculography is a test that uses radioactive materials called tracers to show the heart chambers. The procedure is noninvasive . The instruments do not directly touch the heart.



Alternative Names:

Cardiac blood pooling imaging; Heart scan - nuclear; Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology



How the test is performed:

The test is done while you are resting.

The health care provider will inject a radioactive material called technetium into your vein. This substance attaches to red blood cells and passes through the heart.

Special cameras or scanners trace the substance as it moves through the heart area. In other words, the red blood cells inside the heart that carry the radioactive material form an image that the camera sees. The images may be combined with an electrocardiogram . Using computer software, the images are made to appear as if the heart is moving.



How to prepare for the test:

You may be told not to eat or drink beverages for several hours before the test.



How the test will feel:

You may feel a brief sting or pinch when the IV is inserted into your vein, usually in the arm. You may have trouble staying still during the test.



Why the test is performed:

The test will show how well the blood is pumping through different parts of the heart.



Normal Values:

Normal results indicate that the heart squeezing function is normal. The test can check the overall squeezing strength of the heart (ejection fraction). A normal value is above 55%.

The test also can check the motion of individual parts of the heart. If one part of the heart is moving poorly while the others move well, it may mean that there is a blockage in the artery of the heart that delivers blood to the damaged part.



What abnormal results mean:

Abnormal results may indicate:

Other conditions under which the test may be performed:



What the risks are:

Nuclear imaging tests carry a very low risk of complications. Exposure to the radioisotope delivers a small amount of radiation. This amount is safe for patients who only have an occasional nuclear imaging test.



Special considerations:




Review Date: 5/15/2008
Reviewed By: Alan Berger, MD, Assistant Professor, Divisions of Cardiology and Epidemiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
789 Central Avenue, Dover, NH 03820
Phone: (603) 742-5252
Toll free: 1 (877) 201-7100