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Male reproductive anatomy
Male reproductive anatomy


Before and after testicular repair
Before and after testicular repair


Definition:

Undescended testicle repair is surgery to correct testicles that have not dropped down into the correct position in the scrotum.

See also: Undescended testicle



Alternative Names:

Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair



Description:

As a baby grows in the womb, the testicles develop in the infant's abdomen. They drop down into the scrotum during the last months before birth.

In some newborns, however, one or both testicles do not move down into the correct position. About half of these cases will descend within the first year of life without medical treatment.

Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do not descend on their own.

The surgery is done while the child is asleep (unconscious) and pain-free under general anesthesia . The surgeon makes a cut in the groin, where most undescended testes are located.

After finding the cord that holds the testis in the scrotum, the surgeon unties it from the tissue around it so that the cord's full length is used. A small cut is made in the scrotum and a pouch is created. The testicle is carefully pulled down into the scrotum, and stitched into place. Stitches are used to close any surgical cuts.

In some cases, the procedure can be done laparoscopically , which involves smaller surgical cuts.



Why the Procedure Is Performed:

This surgery is recommended for infants older than 1 year whose testicles have not descended into the scrotum (cryptorchidism ).



Risks:

Risks for any anesthesia are:

Risks for any surgery are:
  • Bleeding
  • Infection


After the Procedure:

Undescended testicle repair is successful in most cases. A small percentage of people will have fertility problems. (See: infertility )

Men who have had undescended testicles should be examined every month throughout their lives for possible tumors. People with undescended testes have higher rates of testicular cancer than those with normal testicle development.



Outlook (Prognosis):

The surgery may be done on an outpatient basis. Bed rest is recommended for the first 2 - 3 days. Avoid strenuous activity, including bicycling, for at least 1 month to allow the testicle to heal in its new position.



References:

Schneck FX, Bellinger MF. Abnormalities of the Testes and Scrotum and Their Surgical Management. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 127.

Elder JS. Disorders and Anomalies of the Scrotal Contents. In: Kliegman Rm, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 18th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 545.




Review Date: 9/7/2008
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Louis S. Liou, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Urology, Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
789 Central Avenue, Dover, NH 03820
Phone: (603) 742-5252
Toll free: 1 (877) 201-7100