Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
(603) 742-5252
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) font size
Physicians
Health Library
Back to Health Library   Print This Page Print    Email to a Friend Email

Visual acuity test
Visual acuity test


Walleyes
Walleyes


Definition:

Amblyopia, or "lazy eye," is the loss of one eye's ability to see details. It is the most common cause of vision problems in children.



Alternative Names:

Lazy eye



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Amblyopia occurs when the brain and eyes do not work together properly. In persons with amblyopia, the brain favors one eye.

The preferred eye has normal vision, but because the brain ignores the other eye, a person's vision ability does not develop normally. Between ages 5 and 10, the brain stops growing and the condition becomes permanent.

Strabismus is the most common cause of amblyopia, and there is often a family history of this condition.

Other causes include:



Symptoms:
  • Eyes that turn in or out
  • Eyes that do not appear to work together
  • Inability to judge depth correctly


Signs and tests:

Amblyopia is usually easily diagnosed with a complete examination of the eyes. Special tests are usually not required.



Treatment:

The main treatment involves patching the normal eye to force use of the lazy eye. Sometimes, drops are used to blur the vision of the normal eye instead of putting a patch on it.

The underlying condition will also require treatment. If the lazy eye is due to a vision problem (nearsightedness or farsightedness), glasses or contact lenses will be prescribed.

For treatment of crossed eyes, see: Strabismus

Children whose vision cannot be expected to fully recover should wear glasses with protective lenses of polycarbonate, as should all children with only one good eye caused by any disorder. Polycarbonate glasses are shatter- and scratch-resistant.



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

Children who receive treatment before age 5 usually have a near complete recovery of normal vision.

Delaying treatment can result in permanent vision problems. After age 10, only a partial recovery of vision can be expected.



Complications:
  • Eye muscle problems that may require several surgeries, which can have complications
  • Permanent vision loss in the affected eye


Calling your health care provider:

Call for an appointment with your health care provider or ophthalmologist if a vision problem is suspected in a young child.



Prevention:

Early recognition and treatment of the problem in children can help to prevent permanent visual loss. All children should have a complete eye examination at least once between ages 3 and 5.



References:

Olitsky SE, Hug D, Smith LP. Disorders of the Uveal Tract. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 18th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 628.

Doshi NR. Amblyopia. Am Fam Physician. Feb. 2007; 75(3): 361.




Review Date: 7/28/2008
Reviewed By: Manju Subramanian, MD, Assistant Professor in Ophthalmology, Vitreoretinal Disease and Surgery, Boston University Eye Associates, Boston, MA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


Find What You Need

Events
Careers
Foundation
About Us
Contact
Directions
News
Social Media Agreement
Joint Notice
Web Privacy Policy
WDH Staff Portal

Centers & Services

Cancer Center
Cardiovascular Care
Joint Replacement
Women & Children's
Physician Offices
Other Services

Conditions & Treatments

Health Library

Support Services

Support Groups
Care-Van
Dental Center
Social Work
Food & Nutrition
Integrative Wellness
Spiritual Care
Concerns & Grievances
Homecare and Hospice

For Patients

Pay Your Bill Online
Pricing Estimates
Financial Assistance
Interpreter Services
Surgery Preparation
Medical Record Request
Advance Directives
Clinical Research & Trials

For Healthcare Professionals

Work and Life
Financial Well-Being
Career and Growth

The Wentworth-Douglass Health System includes:

 

Address

Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
789 Central Avenue, Dover, NH 03820
Phone: (603) 742-5252
Toll free: 1 (877) 201-7100