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Endocrine glands
Endocrine glands


Definition:

Addison's disease is a disorder that occurs when the adrenal glands do not produce enough of their hormones.



Alternative Names:

Adrenocortical hypofunction; Chronic adrenocortical insufficiency; Primary adrenal insufficiency



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

The adrenal glands are small hormone-secreting organs located on top of each kidney. They consist of the outer portion (called the cortex) and the inner portion (called the medulla).

The cortex produces 3 types of hormones:

  • The glucocorticoid hormones (such as cortisol) maintain sugar (glucose) control, decrease (suppress) immune response , and help the body respond to stress.
  • The mineralocorticoid hormones (such as aldosterone) regulate sodium and potassium balance.
  • The sex hormones, androgens (male) and estrogens (female), affect sexual development and sex drive.

Addison's disease results from damage to the adrenal cortex. The damage causes the cortex to produce less of its hormones.

This damage may be caused by the following:

  • The immune system mistakenly attacking the gland (autoimmune disease)
  • Infections such as tuberculosis , HIV, or fungal infections
  • Hemorrhage, blood loss
  • Tumors
  • Use of blood-thinning drugs (anticoagulants)

Risk factors for the autoimmune type of Addison's disease include other autoimmune diseases :

Certain genetic defects may cause these conditions.



Symptoms:

Signs and tests:

Tests may show:

Other tests may include:

This disease may also change the results of the following tests:



Treatment:

Treatment with replacement corticosteroids will control the symptoms of this disease. However, you will usually need to take these drugs for life. People often receive a combination of glucocorticoids (cortisone or hydrocortisone) and mineralocorticoids (fludrocortisone).

The health care provider may increase the medication dose in times of:

  • Infection
  • Injury
  • Stress

During an extreme form of adrenal insufficiency, adrenal crisis , you must inject hydrocortisone immediately. Supportive treatment for low blood pressure is usually needed as well.

Some people with Addison's disease are taught to give themselves an emergency injection of hydrocortisone during stressful situations. It is important for you to always carry a medical identification card that states the type of medication and the proper dose needed in case of an emergency.

Never skip doses of your medication for this condition, because life-threatening reactions may occur.



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

With hormone replacement therapy, most people with Addison's disease are able to lead normal lives.



Complications:

Complications can occur if you take too little or too much adrenal hormone supplement.

Complications also may result from the following related illnesses:



Calling your health care provider:

Call your health care provider if:

  • You are unable to keep your medication down due to vomiting.
  • You have been diagnosed with Addison's disease, and you have stress such as infection, injury, trauma, or dehydration. You may need to have your medication adjusted.
  • Your weight increases over time.
  • Your ankles begin to swell.
  • You develop other new symptoms.

If you have symptoms of adrenal crisis, give yourself an emergency injection of your prescribed medication. If it is not available, go to the nearest emergency room or call 911.

Symptoms of adrenal crisis include:



Prevention:



References:

Stewart PM. The adrenal cortex. In: Kronenberg H, Melmed S, Polonsky K, Larsen PR, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2008:chap 14.




Review Date: 3/18/2008
Reviewed By: Elizabeth H. Holt, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Yale University. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Phone: (603) 742-5252
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