Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
(603) 742-5252
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) font size
Physicians
Health Library
Back to Health Library   Print This Page Print    Email to a Friend Email

Ascites with ovarian cancer, CT scan
Ascites with ovarian cancer, CT scan


Digestive system organs
Digestive system organs


Definition:

Ascites is excess fluid in the space between the tissues lining the abdomen and abdominal organs (the peritoneal cavity).



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

A person with ascites usually has severe liver disease . Ascites is caused by high pressure in the blood vessels of the liver (portal hypertension) and low albumin levels.

Disorders that may be associated with ascites include:



Symptoms:



Signs and tests:

A physical examination may reveal a swollen abdomen or belly.

Paracentesis may be performed. This procedure involves using a thin needle to pull fluid from the abdomen. The fluid is tested in various ways to determine the cause of ascites.



Treatment:

The condition that causes ascites will be treated, if possible.

Treatment may include:

  • Diuretics, usually spironolactone (Aldactone) and furosemide (Lasix), which help remove the fluid
  • Antibiotics, if an infection develops
  • Limiting salt in the diet (no more than 1,500 mg/day of sodium)
  • Avoiding drinking alcohol

Procedures used for ascites that do not respond to medical treatment include:

  • Placing a tube into the area to drain the ascites
  • Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS )


Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):



Complications:

Calling your health care provider:

Anyone who has ascites and develops new abdominal pain and fever should contact their health care provider immediately.



Prevention:



References:

Heidelbaugh JJ, Sherbondy M. Cirrhosis and chronic liver failure: part II. Complications and treatment. Am Fam Physician. 2006;74:767-776.

Salerno F, Cammà C, Enea M, Rössle M, Wong F. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for refractory ascites: a meta-analysis of individual patient data. Gastroenterology. 2007;133:825-834.

Schuppan D, Afdhal NH. Liver cirrhosis. Lancet. 2008;371:838-851.




Review Date: 2/21/2009
Reviewed By: George F. Longstreth, MD, Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, San Diego, California. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


Find What You Need

Events
Careers
Foundation
About Us
Contact
Directions
News
Social Media Agreement
Joint Notice
Web Privacy Policy
WDH Staff Portal

Centers & Services

Cancer Center
Cardiovascular Care
Joint Replacement
Women & Children's
Physician Offices
Other Services

Conditions & Treatments

Health Library

Support Services

Support Groups
Care-Van
Dental Center
Social Work
Food & Nutrition
Integrative Wellness
Spiritual Care
Concerns & Grievances
Homecare and Hospice

For Patients

Pay Your Bill Online
Pricing Estimates
Financial Assistance
Interpreter Services
Surgery Preparation
Medical Record Request
Advance Directives
Clinical Research & Trials

For Healthcare Professionals

Work and Life
Financial Well-Being
Career and Growth

The Wentworth-Douglass Health System includes:

 

Address

Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
789 Central Avenue, Dover, NH 03820
Phone: (603) 742-5252
Toll free: 1 (877) 201-7100