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Abdominal ultrasound
Abdominal ultrasound


Ultrasound in pregnancy
Ultrasound in pregnancy


17 week ultrasound
17 week ultrasound


30 week ultrasound
30 week ultrasound


Carotid duplex
Carotid duplex


Ultrasound comparison
Ultrasound comparison


Thyroid ultrasound
Thyroid ultrasound


Ultrasound
Ultrasound


Ultrasound, normal fetus- ventricles of brain
Ultrasound, normal fetus- ventricles of brain


Definition:

Ultrasound involves the use of high-frequency sound waves to create images of organs and systems within the body.



Alternative Names:

Sonogram



How the test is performed:

An ultrasound machine creates images that allow various organs in the body to be examined. The machine sends out high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives these reflected waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, there is no ionizing radiation exposure with this test.

The test is done in the ultrasound or radiology department. You will be lying down for the procedure. A clear, water-based conducting gel is applied to the skin over the area being examined to help with the transmission of the sound waves. A handheld probe called a transducer is moved over the area being examined. You may be asked to change position so that other areas can be examined.

For specific information about ultrasound examinations, please refer to the following topics:



How to prepare for the test:

Preparation for the procedure will depend on the body region being examined.



How the test will feel:

There is generally little discomfort with ultrasound procedures. The conducting gel may feel slightly cold and wet.



Why the test is performed:

The reason for the examination will depend on your symptoms.



Normal Values:

Results are considered normal if the organs and structures in the region being examined are normal in appearance.



What abnormal results mean:

The significance of abnormal results will depend on the body region being examined and the nature of the problem. Consult your health care provider with any questions and concerns.



What the risks are:

There are no documented risks. No ionizing radiation exposure is involved.



Special considerations:

Most ultrasound examinations are performed in the manner described. However, certain circumstances require that the ultrasound probe be inserted into the body, rather than simply passing it over the skin. Consult your health care provider to determine the specifics of your test.



References:

Cosgrove DO, Meire HB, Lim A, Eckersley RJ. Ultrasound: general principles. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 4th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2001:chap 3.




Review Date: 3/27/2009
Reviewed By: A.D.A.M. Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Greg Juhn, MTPW, David R. Eltz. Previously reviewed by David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine (10/29/2008).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
789 Central Avenue, Dover, NH 03820
Phone: (603) 742-5252
Toll free: 1 (877) 201-7100