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Heart, section through the middle
Heart, section through the middle


Heart, front view
Heart, front view


Definition:

Right heart ventriculography is a study that images the right chambers (atrium and ventricle) of the heart.



Alternative Names:

Angiography - right heart



How the test is performed:

You will get a mild sedative 30 minutes before the procedure. A cardiologist will cleanse the site and numb the area with a local anesthetic. Then a catheter will be inserted into a vein in your neck or groin.

The catheter will be moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can record pressures from the right atrium and right ventricle.

Contrast material ("dye") is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and shape of the heart's chambers.

The procedure will last 1 to several hours.



How to prepare for the test:

You will not be allowed to eat or drink for 6 - 8 hours before the test. The procedure takes place in the hospital. Generally, you will be admitted the morning of the procedure. However, you may need to be admitted the night before.

A health care provider will explain the procedure and its risks. You must sign a consent form.



How the test will feel:

You will be given local anesthesia where the catheter is inserted. The only thing you should feel is pressure at the site. You will not feel the catheter as it is moved through your veins into the right side of the heart.



Why the test is performed:

Right heart angiography is performed to detect the cause of abnormal blood flow through the right side of the heart.



Normal Values:

See Swan-Ganz catheterization.



What abnormal results mean:
  • Abnormal connections between the right and left side of the heart
  • Abnormalities of the right atrium, such as atrial myxoma (rarely)
  • Abnormalities of the valve on the right side of the heart
  • Abnormal pressures or volumes
  • Weakened pumping function of the right ventricle (this could be due to many causes)


What the risks are:

Special considerations:

This test may be combined with coronary angiography .




Review Date: 5/15/2008
Reviewed By: Alan Berger, MD, Assistant Professor, Divisions of Cardiology and Epidemiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
789 Central Avenue, Dover, NH 03820
Phone: (603) 742-5252
Toll free: 1 (877) 201-7100