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Blood in semen
Blood in semen


Definition:

Blood in the semen, called hematospermia, may be undetectable (microscopic) or visible in the ejaculation fluid.



Alternative Names:

Semen - bloody; Blood in ejaculation



Considerations:

Associated symptoms may include:



Common Causes:

Blood in the semen may be caused by inflammation, infection, blockage, or injury anywhere along the male reproductive tract. It may indicate disease or a problem within the urethra, testicles, epididymis, or prostate.

Blood in the semen is usually the result of inflammation of the seminal vesicles, and will usually go away on its own. Often, the cause cannot be determined. If the blood does not clear and ejaculate is persistently stained with blood, more tests should be done. These tests may include urinalysis and culture, semen analysis and culture, and ultrasound of the seminal vesicles.



Home Care:

Minor injuries may be treated with rest, applying ice, and monitoring symptoms. Major injuries may require reconstructive surgery.

Infections can often be treated with antibiotics taken by mouth (or intravenous antibiotics if symptoms are severe).

Blockages are typically treated with surgery. If cancerous tumors are the source of obstruction, radiation or chemotherapy may also be indicated.



Call your health care provider if:

Always call your doctor if you notice any blood in semen.



What to expect at your health care provider's office:

The doctor will perform a physical examination. The doctor will look for fever, swollen lymph nodes, a swollen or tender scrotum, discharge from the urethra, or an enlarged or tender prostate.

To help diagnose the cause of the problem, your doctor will ask medical history questions, such as:

  • How much blood was in the semen?
  • Was microscopic blood ever noticed in the past when the semen was examined for another reason?
  • When was this first noticed? Is it present all the time?
  • Is there anything that seems to have caused this symptom?
  • What other symptoms do you have?

Tests that may be done include:




Review Date: 7/23/2007
Reviewed By: Marc Greenstein, DO, Urologist, North Jersey Center for Urologic Care, Denville, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Phone: (603) 742-5252
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