Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
(603) 742-5252
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) font size
Physicians
Site Search

Celiac sprue - foods to avoid
Celiac sprue - foods to avoid


Definition:

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder passed down through families. When a person with celiac disease eats or drinks anything containing gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, or sometimes oats (including medications), the immune system responds by damaging the lining of the intestinal tract. This damage affects the body's ability to absorb nutrients.

For specific information about the disease (including symptoms and treatment), seeceliac disease .

A gluten-free diet, when followed carefully, helps prevent symptoms of the disease.



Alternative Names:

Gluten-free diet; Gluten sensitive enteropathy - diet; Celiac sprue - diet



Function:



Food Sources:

Staples of the gluten-free diet include:

  • Cereals made without wheat or barley malt
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Meat
  • Milk-based items
  • Potatoes, rice, corn, beans
  • Specialty foods (such as pasta, bread, pancakes, and pastries) made with alternative grains (rice, tapioca, potato, or corn flours and starches)

You can buy these products through local and national food companies, or you can make them from scratch using alternative flours and grains.

The gluten-free diet involves removing all foods, drinks, and medications made from gluten. This means all items made with all-purpose, white, or wheat flour are prohibited. Obvious sources of gluten include:

  • Bagels
  • Bread and breaded foods
  • Buns
  • Cakes
  • Cookies
  • Crackers
  • Gravy
  • Most cereals
  • Most convenience foods
  • Most soups
  • Pancakes
  • Pasta
  • Pie
  • Pizza
  • Stuffing

Less obvious foods that must be eliminated include:

  • Beer
  • Certain candies
  • Certain salad dressings
  • Communion host
  • Croutons
  • Marinades
  • Sauces such as teriyaki and soy

There is a risk of cross-contamination. Items that are naturally gluten-free may become contaminated if they are made on the same production line as, or moved together in the same setting with, foods containing gluten.

Restaurant eating and social gatherings pose another, but manageable, challenge. Calling ahead and special planning become important measures. Label reading becomes a frequent, essential task due to the widespread use of wheat and barley in foods.

Despite its challenges, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet is possible with education and planning.



Side Effects:



Recommendations:

Once you have been diagnosed with celiac disease, it is very important that you talk to a registered dietitian who specializes in celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

Joining a local support group is also recommended. Support groups can help people with celiac disease share practical advice on ingredients, baking, and ways to cope with this life-altering, lifelong disease.

See also: Celiac disease support group

Your doctor might prescribe a multivitamin and mineral or individual nutrient supplement to correct or prevent a deficiency.




Review Date: 6/23/2008
Reviewed By: Patrika Tsai, MD, MPH, Assistant Clinical Professor, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


Find What You Need

Events
Careers
Foundation
About Us
Contact
Directions
News
Social Media Agreement
Joint Notice
Web Privacy Policy
WDH Staff Portal

Centers & Services

Cancer Center
Cardiovascular Care
Joint Replacement
Women & Children's
Physician Offices
Other Services

Conditions & Treatments

Health Information
Ebola Information

Support Services

Support Groups
Care-Van
Dental Center
Social Work
Food & Nutrition
Integrative Wellness
Spiritual Care
Concerns & Grievances
Homecare and Hospice

For Patients

Pay Your Bill Online
Pricing Estimates
Financial Assistance
Interpreter Services
Surgery Preparation
Medical Record Request
Advance Directives
Clinical Research & Trials

For Healthcare Professionals

Work and Life
Financial Well-Being
Career and Growth

The Wentworth-Douglass Health System includes:

 

Address

Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
789 Central Avenue, Dover, NH 03820
Phone: (603) 742-5252
Toll free: 1 (877) 201-7100