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Male reproductive anatomy
Male reproductive anatomy


Male reproductive system
Male reproductive system


Definition:

Anorchia is the absence of both testes at birth.



Alternative Names:

Vanishing testes - anorchia; Empty scrotum - anorchia; Scrotum - empty (anorchia)



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

In the first several weeks after the egg is fertilized, the embryo develops early sex organs. In the male, if the early testes fail to develop before 8 weeks into the pregnancy, the baby will have female genitals.

If the testes are lost between 8 and 10 weeks, the baby will be born with ambiguous genitalia . This means the child will have parts of both male and female genitals.

However, if the testes are lost after the time when the male genitals differentiate (between 12 and 14 weeks), the baby will have normal male genitals (penis and scrotum), but no testes. This is known as congenital anorchia, or the "vanishing testes syndrome."

The cause is unknown, but in some cases there are genetic factors.



Symptoms:
  • Normal outside genitals before puberty
  • Failure to start puberty at the correct time and lack of secondary sex characteristics (penis and pubic hair growth, deepening of the voice, and increase in muscle mass)


Signs and tests:

Signs include:

  • Empty scrotum
  • Lack of secondary sex characteristics

Tests include:



Treatment:

Treatment includes:

  • Artificial (prosthetic) testicle implants
  • Male hormones (androgens)
  • Psychological support


Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

The outlook is good with treatment.



Complications:

Complications include:

  • Face, neck, or back abnormalities (occasionally)
  • Infertility
  • Psychological problems due to gender


Calling your health care provider:

Call your health care provider if your male child appears to have extremely small or absent testicles or does not appear to be entering puberty during his early teens.



Prevention:



References:

Rapaport R. Hypofunction of the testes. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 18th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007: chap 584.

Sigman M, Jarrow JP. Male infertility. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007: chap 19.




Review Date: 9/7/2008
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Louis S. Liou, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Urology, Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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Phone: (603) 742-5252
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